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Are you ready for Alabama’s fall severe weather season?

Published: Oct. 22, 2021 at 4:57 PM CDT
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BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) - Many people associate severe weather with springtime, but Alabama has a secondary severe weather season that’s just beginning.

Fall severe weather season in Alabama typically runs from the beginning of November until mid-December.

But if you’ve spent any amount of time in the state, you know severe weather can strike any time.

The severity of the fall season varies from year to year and it’s not uncommon to see tornadoes in October and into the winter months.

According to the National Weather Service, between 1950 to 2018, Alabama had at least one documented tornado in the month of November or December 71% of the time.

Many are still recovering from the January tornado that ripped through the northern part of Jefferson County.

But it’s not just tornadoes we need to be mindful of.

Flooding is the second leading cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S., and we’ve already experienced record flooding this month.

WBRC meteorologists said the important thing to remember is that severe weather doesn’t just happen in the spring and preparation is key.

“You might want to think about getting flood insurance because we’ve already had several flood events seems this past year and there could be more down the road. So, know what to do in those certain cases, have ways to receive those warnings, know where to go, not only if you’re at home, but know where to go where you’re working at, if you’re shopping at a grocery store, where would you go? Have a plan in place, and if you’re prepared, there’s nothing to be scared about,” said Meteorologist, Matt Daniel.

Daniel said most storm-related damage happens with severe thunderstorm winds. Treat a severe thunderstorm warning the same as you would a tornado warning.

And you can always stay weather aware by downloading the WBRC First Alert Weather App.

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